Connect with us

Published

on

I’ve been thinking a lot about what it’s like to live with an EV recently. Doing what I do, I often get friends asking me what car they should buy. I always give stellar advice that would save my friends money, time, and get them a great car for their needs. Do they ever follow my advice? No, no they don’t.

With the ever present climate doom, I try to make as many people as I can consider an electric car, so they can make an impact and be ahead of the adoption curve. Soon they won’t have a choice, as going electric will be the only option. None of this seems to motivate them right now, though.

Let me put you in my shoes. The conversation I have with my never ending stream of help-seekers usually goes something like this:

  • Them: “Hey Matt, I’m going to buy a new car. What should I get?”
  • Me: “What do you need the car for? How much do you drive? And what’s your budget?”
  • Them: “I drive 10 miles to work every day, to the shops at weekends, and to Scotland a couple of times a year. We just had a child, so we want something safe, and spacious. We’ve got about $500 a month.”
  • Me: “Have you considered something electric?”
  • Them: “Oh I would love electric! But they’re just no good right now, there are no chargers, we won’t be able to drive to Scotland, and they’re just too expensive.”
  • Me: “So what were you going to buy before you asked me?”
  • Them: “<insert something generic, and probably German>
  • Me: Heavy sigh “Ok… But hear me out…”

And so it goes on.

I proceed to bestow the benefits of electricity, how it will save them money in the long run. I then remind them that renting a large comfortable car for those long but very infrequent drives is an option, one that will still be cheaper than owning a petrol SUV long term. Likewise, I laud them for how they’d be making an investment in their child’s future by being slightly kinder to the environment. Rarely have I been able to get through to them. The people are still stuck in their ways.

But do my friends have a point? Are they (the EVs, not my friends) a pain to live with? Or are my friends more stubborn than I care to admit?

In this long read we’ll find out if they do have a point. We’ll also see what it’s like to drive and charge an EV, whether range anxiety is real, and what’s up with Android Automotive.

Seeing for myself

I’ve been lucky to drive quite a few electric cars over the past 8 years, and yet I’ve never actually lived with one. It seems the only way to find out what that is like is to do it for real for a week, take it on a road trip, put as many miles on it as I can, and see for myself: the truth.

Naturally, I gave our friends over at Polestar a call, and after a bit of prodding, they finally caved and agreed to lend me a Polestar 2 for a week. What a lucky boy I am. There were no restrictions or expectations, they simply gave me the official owner’s handover at their Amsterdam store, helped me set up my Google account with Android Automotive, left me with the keys, and pointed me to the open road.

Polestar 2 picture
Credit: M Beedham
The Polestar 2 has plenty of road presence, but without shouting too loudly. It whispers.

With that my week, my adventure, as an EV “owner” began.

Life as an EV driver

What makes my adventure all the more… adventurous is that I don’t have an EV charger at my home. Not only did I set out to prove that living with an EV is child’s play — I did so in less than optimal circumstances.

I picked up the Polestar 2 on a Wednesday. It had about 80% charge, and around 300 km of range at the time. That’s more than plenty for what I had planned for my weekend, but I wasn’t leaving until Friday, so I surprised a friend with a trip to the beach. Why? Because I could. Having not had a car at my free disposal for a few years, I was swiftly reminded just how great having a one is. It’s easy to see why they caught on.

EV, charging, sun, solar power, EV, future
Credit: M Beedham
At Bloemendaal aan Zee you can charge your EV on solar power. Yes, there’s enough sun in the Netherlands for this.

The 25 km drive from Amsterdam to the beach at Bloemendaal aan Zee (that’s Dutch for “flower hill on sea” — yes, there’s actually a hill!) used about 8% charge. There was plenty of stopping and starting, roundabouts, and accelerations out of corners. All these moments of “getting back up to speed,” use energy. More energy than just cruising along conservatively. Thankfully, with braking regeneration set to max, the car was consuming around 22 kw per 100 km. Not too bad for this style of driving.

The highlight of the trip came as a happy little surprise once we got to the beach. At the car park, there were EV chargers, all of them were available for use, and they were powered by solar panels that also doubled as a canopy covering the car park itself. As it turns out, there’s enough sun in the Netherlands to charge EVs at 22 kWh! WHO KNEW!

charging, EV, polestar 2, electric, car
Credit: M Beedham
The Polestar 2 sucking in those sweet solar kWh. In an hour, I added about 12 kw of juice, more than I used to get there.

After a walk on the beach for an hour, the car had managed to take in just over 12 kW of energy from those beautiful sunbeams. The charge was now sitting above 80%. Plenty of charge for the home trip, and the following day. But just to be sure, on Thursday before my weekend of travel I charged the car up to 100% using a 22 kw street side charger, that is handily located not too far from home.

There are literally hundreds of these dotted around Amsterdam, and they are super easy to use. The trick, however, is getting to one when it’s free. When you do, simply plug in, and scan your RFID card, the lights on the unit turn blue, and the car starts charging. When you’re done, simply reverse this process.

After a few hours the car was sitting at 100%, so I unplugged to free up the spot for someone else, and got ready for the long drive to follow.

Fully charged and away for the weekend

Friday came, and I left the comfort and convenience of the roadside chargers in the Randstad, and headed east towards the expanses of the Veluwe — the closest thing the Netherlands has to actual wilderness — seeking answers.

Is it possible to survive with an EV without having direct or exclusive access to a charging point?

For my long weekend of electron supping, I stayed at what the Dutch call a Pipowagen, just north of Arnhem, on the edge of the Veluwe national park. It’s roughly 120 km from Amsterdam. About an hour and a half’s drive, the kind of drive you’d happily make after work at the end of the week if you wanted a quick getaway.

Polestar, pipowagen, car, ev, future, cabin
Credit: M Beedham
Even though the Polestar and the Pipowagen are very, very different, they make quite the matching pair. It’s almost like we planned it.

According to its owners, the Pipowagen was placed in the woods in the 1930s, and has stood there ever since. It’s decidedly unlike the Polestar. It’s old, traditional, and is the exact opposite of what the Polestar embodies. Even so, it felt like a great place to reflect on the past and muse about the future.

Oh and if you were wondering why it’s called a Pipowagen, we have the Dutch to thank for that. Back in the ‘70s, there was a TV show about a traveling clown, called Pipo, that lived in this kind of wooden circus caravan. His was pulled along by a rather forlorn looking donkey, and thus became known as a Pipowagen.

Now, the car’s range would allow me to drive there and back on one full charge, but I wouldn’t be able to do much driving around the Veluwe unless I found chargers on my arrival.

The Pipowagen does have electricity, but after my hosts told me that plugging in anything more than a kettle would blow the fuses, I decided charging it from the mains was not a good idea. I would have to get creative and charge at every opportunity.

Anxiety free motoring

Despite being left to the mercy of the Netherlands’ public charging infrastructure and heading into the woods, I didn’t experience any range anxiety while at my destination. Not an ounce. I drove the car with abandon, and I didn’t care one bit about possibly running out of charge.

Why? Well, the answer is simple: when you really start looking for them, you’ll realize chargers are everywhere. They’re by the street side, they’re at dedicated fast-charging locations on motorways, they’re at petrol stations, and even at branches of McDonald’s.

charging, shell garage, electricity, EV
Credit: M Beedham
Charging at a Shell garage. The view was pretty boring, but it charged pretty fast so it wasn’t too much of an issue. I used the time to call some friends and family and check in.

All it takes is a subtle shift in perspective. As an EV driver, you quickly stop caring about petrol stations. They simply don’t matter anymore, and soon they become nothing more than an antiquated relic of the past. A soon-to-be subject for an episode of Black Mirror. We’ll look back and mock the notion of having to go somewhere to fill a car with dirty stinky fuel.

When your eyes open to EV chargers, you’ll realize they aren’t all at out-of-town locations – they’re all over the place. “Filling-up” becomes a process of management rather than reacting to a red light on your dashboard.

The trick to charging an EV is plugging-in at every opportunity. Make this part of your routine, and you’ll never go far wrong.

Plugsurfing makes surfing plugs child’s play

It’s also worth pointing out that I was using a Plugsurfing RFID fob to take care of charging. Every new Polestar comes with one, and other manufacturers are doing the same.

Plugsurfing is simply great. It’s like a personal assistant that takes care of managing all your charging platform subscriptions. There’s no need to have multiple apps, and different key cards for all the different charging stations available. Instead, you have one: the Plugsurfing fob.

Plugsurfing then takes care of paying all the different services you use and gives you one bill at the end of each month.

Polestar 2, vehicles, cars, plugsurfing, charging, network
Credit: Polestar
All new Polestar 2 vehicles delivered in Europe will be supplied with a Plugsurfing RFID key tag.

It’s simple, easy, and removes ALL the friction between user and charging points. I didn’t come across a charger it wasn’t compatible with either. If you’re an EV driver, get yourself signed up to something like this. It takes all the hassle out of charging. Seriously, it was a revelation.

After a few days in the woods with the Polestar, it’s plain to see any statements about charging, range anxiety, and practicality, are now nothing more than dated clichés. Every car park I went to in the Polestar had at least a few bays with available chargers, so I was able to add a bit more juice each time.

In truth, the whole experience has left me with one question: “Why weren’t we doing this sooner?”

The whole lifestyle is far simpler than most people seem to realize. If I had the option of charging at home it would have been even easier.

No power, no problem

Going off-grid in an EV isn’t as insane as it sounds.

By charging from a blend of standard 22 kw chargers and fast chargers, I was able to keep the car topped up to a comfortable level of juice that let me do all the driving I wanted to do, at all times. Most of the time the battery was above 50% charge.

I rarely checked the car’s remaining power and instead just used the estimated range to guide me when I needed to charge. Planning ahead and considering how much driving I’d be doing in the coming days became second nature, and a quick way of determining when I needed to charge. It’s no more difficult than driving gasoline, but instead of reacting to a low fuel light, you proactively plan to ensure you’re prepared. It’s not hard.

Throughout my journey though, the Polestar’s battery didn’t deplete as quickly as I expected. Quite often, I plugged the car in to charge because I could, not because I had to.

Before setting off into the wilderness, I thought I was going to feel caged. As if the car’s range would hold me back from driving and seeing everything that I wanted to see. That it would become a nuisance, and a hindrance. In truth, I experienced none of this.

fastned, car, chargers, ev, future
Credit: M Beedham
Look for these yellow canopies when driving around the Netherlands. They’re the Fastned network of fast chargers.

The benefits of driving an EV: the smoothness, the quietness, the eye-watering acceleration, and the lack of emissions far outweigh any required habitual changes. Anyone that resists the change is a Luddite and a philistine.

Now, I admit my experiences might not be globally universal.

The Netherlands is blessed with a robust and dense network of street side chargers, and highway fast-chargers from the likes of Ionity and Fastned are springing up at all major service stations. I even found a McDonald’s that had a fast charger. In the time it took me to order and eat a burger, I added over 10% from the McCharger.

The darling of the EV world

Now, what kind of test drive would this be if I didn’t share some of my experiences of what it’s actually like to drive and live with the Polestar 2?

The Polestar 2 is slowly becoming the electric darling of the motoring world. It’s a car that old-school motoring journalists love as much as tech-focused future thinkers do. It strikes a near-perfect balance between the past and the future.

polestar 2, car, ev, future, electric
Credit: M Beedham
The Polestar 2… I spent quite some time walking around and looking at this car from every angle. I couldn’t find an angle where it’s not striking, and poised.

It still feels like a car. Controls are where they should be, there are enough physical buttons, there are no unexpected or confusing surprises, there are no gimmicks, and compared to the closest competition it feels more mature.

It doesn’t take long to understand why it’s so loved. Sure, it’s not going to win in a game of electric car Top Trumps: it’s not the fastest, it doesn’t have the biggest battery, or the longest range, and it certainly won’t play fart noises on command — thank God for that one, though.

But to view a car based on discrete characteristics is childish and reductionist. What the Polestar 2 is, is a fantastic sum of its parts. You’d probably expect us to say that, being sponsored by Polestar and all, but go drive one for yourself and tell me I’m wrong.

The P2 gets me excited in the same way the BMW i8 did when that first came out. Despite being quite different, the Polestar feels like the distilled essence of the future of motoring that BMW was going for, but then formed into a package friendly for the whole family.

The build quality is exceptional, and the acceleration is intoxicating. It also has the perfect balance of touchscreen and physical buttons, something that car makers are going to have to learn to get right.

cars, tesla, vw, model 3, ev, future, electric
Credit: M Beedham
It seems I wasn’t the only one that had the idea of having some time away from the city in an EV. Here in the Netherlands, EVs are increasingly popular. The Tesla Model 3 and VW ID.3 are common sights, as are Polestar 2s for that matter.

Like most of the EVs I’ve driven, the Polestar has a sort of Jekyll and Hyde personality. I don’t mean that if you make one wrong move it’ll rip your face off, but rather, that it is immensely relaxing to drive, but has raucous amounts of power that can be deployed with no more than a split second’s notice.

It means you can drive it smooth and cordially like Aloysius Parker, or fast and flamboyant like Frank Martin, and it will respond as you need it to.

Ergonomically speaking, the Polestar worked great for me. Its door sills come up high, and the central console is positioned tight and close to the driver, putting everything at your fingertips. It cocoons the driver such that you feel more like a pilot than a motorist.

The best bit of all, when I look down at the steering wheel, I see that Polestar logo and am reminded I’m driving something uniquely special.

It seems others see it the same way too. The Polestar 2 is a real head turner. As I sat on the deck of the Pipowagen reading on one fine evening, everyone that walked past said something about the car. Those that knew, knew, and pointed out, “Oh, check it out that’s one of those Polestars.” Those that didn’t know exclaimed, “Wow, what is that?”

But it’s a subtle about it, it doesn’t scream “Look at me!” like high performance cars sometimes do, it whispers, and it lures.

It’s not totally perfect, though. The car I drove came with the performance pack, which includes gorgeous forged alloy wheels, “gold” seatbelts, and Ohlins adjustable suspension. Which is all great, except to adjust the suspension you need to use spanners and do it manually. It would have been really great to see electronically adjustable suspension that can be tuned from the cabin.

car, future, ev, polestar, electric
Credit: M Beedham
The forged alloy wheels, and gold brake calipers are the jewelry that sets this already beautiful car apart from the competition.

About that Android Automotive

The Polestar’s central screen is gorgeous, and is a joy to use. As cars move towards touchscreens and away from physical buttons, I worry that quickly accessing vehicle settings safely, while on the move, will become a thing of the past.

Designing a cabin that’s both minimalist and contemporary whilst still providing familiarity is an art form that carmakers will have to hone. The Polestar however feels like it’s there already.

Gear selection is still done by a classic gear lever, which is in the middle of the cabin, where it should be. Things like wing mirrors, audio, and seat position are all controlled by physical buttons, which are placed where they should be. The car’s driver assistance features can be controlled from buttons on the steering wheel, which is where they should be. And the air conditioning controls remain fixed at the bottom of the screen for quick and easy access.

The Google Voice assistant is where controlling the car enters a whole new world. It’s near faultless, and makes an exceptional case that voice activation will be the future of how we interact with our cars, especially when we need to keep our attention on the road.

car, ev, android, automotive, future, electric
Credit: Polestar
Android Automotive holds the potential to be a motoring revolution for infotainment systems. But right now, it feels under utilized.

Want to search for some music, just tell it what you want to hear, and it finds it. Want to navigate home? Simply tell it, and it will get you there.

It’s a great tool when it comes to keeping your eyes on the road, and still being able to control the more nuanced features of the car that don’t have easy to access physical buttons.

The idea that third-party developers are going to get the opportunity to bring us dedicated apps for our cars makes my mind shoot in all directions and marvel at what people will invent. What’s more, new apps will help to keep the car feeling fresh and up to date for years to come.

I truly believe it’s the future. Android Automotive has bags of potential, and this excites me a lot. But that’s all surface level stuff, after diving deeper into what Android Automotive has to offer, I was left wanting.

Fall short of potential

The problem is it’s all potential, and that is still firmly in the future. Right now, Android Automotive doesn’t feel quite as polished or finished as it should. It’s like having a high-end gaming PC and not having any games to play on it.

On my last day, I drove around exploring the area with the sole intention of running the battery down to a point where I wouldn’t be able to make it home on the remaining charge.

By the end of my aimless touring, Google Maps told me that I’d return home with less than 10% charge. As I’m not able to plug in at my abode, and am reliant on public chargers, I definitely needed to charge on my trip home.

Not to worry, there are fast chargers on most major roads in the Netherlands, and there were plenty on my intended route back to civilization. I knew this because I researched it, but if I hadn’t, I’d have been at the mercy of Android Automotive’s mapping options.

The troubles begin

Now, because I was able to get home with some charge left, Google Maps didn’t automatically route me to a charger as part of my planned journey — fine.

Making matters worse, it was painfully fiddly to get it to add one to my journey manually. Google Maps kept trying to route me through the middle of Utrecht to use a standard road-side charger, not a fast charger. It would have taken hours to add enough charge to complete my journey with enough to spare. No matter what I tried, I couldn’t get it to find a fast charger on a main road.

Another problem was that if I selected a different route, one that I knew would take me past fast chargers, it would just select that route and start navigation. I would then lose the opportunity to add a charging stop.

Not to worry, thanks to Android Automotive being an open platform there are other options. I pivoted to an alternative navigation app, A Better Route Planner. And for the most part, it lives up to its name. It’s not as clean looking, but it is better than Google Maps when it comes to navigation for the nuances of EVs.

car, ev, future, electric
Credit: Polestar
Thanks to Android Automotive being an open platform, there are other apps to use, like A Better Route Planner. I just hope more, better, route planners come to the platform.

I was able to select a fast charger, add it to my route, and the guidance split up my route into two sections: one taking me first to the charger, and then one to my final destination.

A solution, of sorts

It was all going so well, but then I encountered another problem. The charger that ABRP had allowed me to select was on the other carriageway, the other side of a solid central reservation.

ABRP was going to have me leave the motorway, go back in the opposite direction, charge, then take the next exit, and turn round again to resume my journey in the correct direction. It would have not only taken longer to get there, it was going to add a load of miles that I didn’t need to drive. It would have added at least 60 minutes to my journey, including half an hour charging — not efficient at all.

Instead, I ignored the navigation, held my nerve, kept driving, and hoped I would pass another suitable charger further down the road. After 10 more minutes driving I did.

Fastned, charger, ev, electric
Credit: M Beedham
There are Fastned chargers popping up all over the place in NL. In the Randstad you’re never more than 20 to 30 minutes drive from one. 300 kW baby!

In the end, it wasn’t a massive problem, but it wasn’t exactly a smooth or seamless process. Why didn’t the route planner just route me to a charger on my side of the carriageway? Why was Google refusing to suggest fast chargers to me?

It shows the maps and navigation systems don’t quite offer the level of control or detail that we need as EV drivers, yet.

It’s worth pointing out that the Polestar 2’s navigation systems would route me to a charger if I was going to run out of charge, that acts as an eternal safeguard, so you’ll never be left stranded. But for those that want to plan with a bit more thought, the system doesn’t quite feel up to scratch.

The upside is that with OTA updates, and the fact it’s all based on Google Maps, the system is continually improving, and I see that these issues can be ironed out. With infrastructure also improving, this will become less of a problem too.

My friends are Luddites

Let’s zoom out from that moment of minor indiscretion, and go back to the original tenet guiding my exploratory adventure. Is it actually as hard to live with an EV as people make out?

The simple answer is: no. No, it’s not.

All in all, I still don’t quite understand what people find so hard about living with an EV. Even taking one away for the weekend, where I relied on it for transport and didn’t have direct access to a charger, I was never left anxious about running out of charge or not being able to drive far enough.

Sure, I didn’t drive that far, but had I been allowed to (y’know covid is still a thing) I’m certain I could have made it across Europe without a hitch. Stopping every few hours to charge up isn’t just good for the car, it’s good for the driver too, it gives time to refresh, unwind, and regain some concentration.

You might say that I could have done more to challenge the car’s range, but the trip I went on is the kind of trip normal people take to get away from the city for a long weekend. It’s perfectly average, and one that pretty much every EV of today will be able to manage. It shows that it’s not just perfectly doable, it comes with no additional hassle at all.

So what do I have to say to my “friends?” Do they have a point?

If anything, I’m now questioning why they’re my friends, more so than I did before this trip.

Sure there are some quirks, but driving an EV isn’t just a bit better, it’s light-years ahead of gasoline.


Do EVs excite your electrons? Do ebikes get your wheels spinning? Do self-driving cars get you all charged up? 

Then you need the weekly SHIFT newsletter in your life. Click here to sign up.

Naabiae Nenu-B is a Medical Health Student and an SEO Specialist dedicated to flushing the web off fake news and scam scandals. He aims at being "Africa's Best Leak and Review Blogger" and that's the unwavering stand of Xycinews Media.

Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Leaks

How to Install Flexible Hose

Published

on

Unlike standard metal tubing, flexible hoses allow motion between two end points for easier routing over, under, through, or around obstacles. They’re often used to transport corrosive or flammable fluids and operate under high pressure, so it’s crucial to install them correctly.

Only competent qualified experts should attempt to install flexible hoses to ensure they meet the relevant standards for safe operation. It’s essential to choose the correct type of hose and hose fittings for the specific application and location, or you may be looking at disastrous consequences.

For example, a stainless steel hose would be suitable for gases or liquids under high temperatures and pressures, ideal for use in heating or ventilation and the automotive or power generation industries. Meanwhile, a composite hose would be the best choice for working with petrochemicals due to its higher resistance against corrosion.

Once you’ve identified which type of flexible hose is appropriate for your usage, read this guide on installing flexible hoses to ensure that they meet or exceed the required parameters and that your configuration doesn’t limit their lifespan.

Flexible hose installation checklist

Follow this straightforward run-through to make sure your flexible hose is fitted correctly.

  • Check there is no visible damage to the flexible hose prior to installation.
  • Make sure the hose is a sufficient length to create a smooth curve without stretching or twisting.
  • Use the appropriate type and size of tools to secure the fittings.
  • Allow some slack on the straight ends of the hose, as over-tightening can cause stress corrosion cracking.
  • Do not bend hoses near the fittings. If there’s a tight bend required, use elbow fittings to join hoses instead.
  • Ensure the ends are sealed securely, especially for insulated hoses where a build-up of moisture can cause them to fail.
  • Check that the hose isn’t rubbing against any other surfaces in its installed position.
  • Flush the circuit to clear any debris and pressure test to make sure all connections are secure.

Hose assemblies should undergo periodical inspections to identify any issues before serious failures potentially occur. Look out for the following:

  • Frayed or bulging steel braiding
  • Deformations such as twisting or flat spots
  • Slippage, cracks, or dents
  • Loose fitting attachments or covers
  • Contact with adjacent piping or machinery
  • Indications of corrosion

If you notice that any of these faults are present, repairs or replacements will be needed.

Tips for installing flexible hose

There are several common causes of flexible hose failure that should be avoided at all costs. By following these tips, you’ll make sure that your hose installation is secure, effective, and long-lasting.

Handle flexible hose with care

Lift and carry metal hoses carefully to prevent abrasions prior to installation – never drag them along the floor or let them make contact with other objects or materials in the vicinity.

When not in use, flexible hoses should be stored away from fumes and potential spillages, such as sprays and weld splatter.

Avoid torque

Torque distorts the hose and creates more stress on the twisted area, reducing its strength and eventually resulting in premature failure.

Only bend the hose gently into a natural curve rather than twisting laterally. Avoid accidental torque by holding the hose in place while the fittings are tightened.

No out of plane flexing

You can avoid twisting the hose and damaging wire reinforcement by only bending the hose in one plane. If the hose is bent in multiple planes, it reduces the hose’s pressure capacity.

Alternatively, you can use multiple sections of hose coupled and clamped between bends if multi-plane bending is unavoidable in the installation space.

No axial extension or compression

Flexible hoses must be properly anchored and supported to absorb movement, as excessive weight will compress the hose and relax the tension.

This puts the assembly at accelerated risk of structural failure if the hose is not appropriately guided.

No sharp bends or over-bending

Do not exceed the recommended bend radius of the product, because bending in multiple places and too close to fittings creates excessive strain that can result in leakage from fatigue cracks.

To prevent over-bending and sharp bends, allow extra length for expansion and contraction when cutting the hose and use elbow fittings or swivel joints to connect smaller sections of hose.

Always provide adequate support and protection

When bent into a curve, both ends of the hose must be supported to prevent sagging. However, you should never over-tighten the fittings to keep the ends straight, as this restricts movement and can result in bulging.

You should use clamps on the fittings to hold the hose in place away from adjacent surfaces, and consider protective hose covers as an extra defence against abrasion.

Route hoses appropriately

Plan the hose routing in advance as much as possible to avoid stacking hoses or twisting them around each other.

Cluttered hose assembly isn’t only unpleasant to look at, but it also causes abrasion and makes safety maintenance much harder.

You should also prevent external exposure to excessive heat or corrosive or flammable chemicals that can damage the outer surface.

Continue Reading

Leaks

How to Log in to Linksys Extender and Access the Setup Page?

Published

on

Internet lovers are increasing rapidly day by day and that is why Linksys WiFi range extender comes into the picture. This device allows netizens to enjoy the blazing-fast WiFi speed on their devices that are connected to Linksys extender setup-xxx network. Sometimes, the Linksys extender setup process can be a daunting task for 90 percent of users. If you are also having trouble while accessing the Linksys extender setup page, then here’s the list of some effective fixes that will help you log in to your device and access the setup page in a hassle-free way.

Without wasting much time, let’s get started!

Steps to Access the Linksys Extender Setup Page 

To tweak various settings on your Linksys extender, it is important for you to access its web-based setup page. In order to initiate the setting changes, you need to access the Linksys extender login page. Walk through the steps listed below and know how to make the Linksys extender login process an easy task.

Connect Your Linksys Extender to Your Router

To access the web-based setup page of your Linksys extender, you need to connect it to your router using an Ethernet cable.

Once you’re done, plug in your Linksys extender and power it on. Do not proceed until and unless you see a stable green LED on your Linksys WiFi range extender.

Open a Web Browser to Access the Linksys Extender’s Web-based Setup Page

As soon as you are done with the process of connecting your Linksys extender and router, the next thing you need to do is to open a web browser on a PC or laptop.

Pro Tip: To prevent Linksys extender login issue, you are advised to use an up-to-date internet browser only. Besides, clear junk files and browsing history also.

Connect to Linksys Extender’s WiFi

To reach the Linksys extender login page and access its setup page without any hassle, you need to connect your device to the Linksys extender’s WiFi.

Use the Default Web Address

To log in to your Linksys extender, you need its default web address, i.e. extender.linksys.com. In case you are not aware of the web address, see the Linksys extender manual or contact us right away.

After getting the Linksys extender’s default IP address, type it into the address bar of your internet browser. Make sure you type the web address correctly. Thereafter, press the Enter key on your keyboard and you will be taken to Linksys extender login page.

Pro Tip: You can also use the default Linksys extender IP address to access the login page. See the Linksys extender manual for the default IP address.

Enter the Linksys Extender Login Credentials

Once you reach the login page of your Linksys extender, you need to enter its default username and password in the given fields and hit the Log In button.

Note: If you have changed the login details at the time of Linksys extender setup, bear in mind that the default ones will no longer work. So, make sure to use the correct Linksys extender login credentials.

Access the Linksys Extender’s Web-based Setup Page

After following the steps listed above in the exact given order, you would be able to access the web-based setup page of your Linksys extender. Now, navigate to the settings page of your extender and make changes as per your needs.

Endnote

Our guide on how to log in to Linksys extender and access the setup page ends here. We hope that you will now get access to the web-based setup page after successful Linksys range extender login. On the off chance if the steps listed above don’t help you make the most out of your Linksys extender, seek help from our expert technicians and let them fix all your extender-related problems in no time. 

Continue Reading

Leaks

Why Am I Not Able to Perform Netgear Extender Login?

Published

on

Accessing your Netgear WiFi extender’s web admin panel allows you to configure its advanced settings. And if that’s exactly what you aren’t able to do, the following reasons might be acting as a barrier in your way:

  • Weak internet connection
  • Poor connection between extender and router
  • Corrupted or outdated firmware
  • The hardware of your extender is age-old
  • The LED light on your device isn’t green

To stop these reasons from letting you perform Netgear extender login, mentioned below are the troubleshooting tips you need to follow:

Know How to Access the Netgear Extender Login Page

  1. Ensure Your Device Has Access to a Strong Internet Connection

One of the major reasons why you’re facing issues while trying to log into your Netgear extender is because of a weak internet connection. Thus, make sure that your WiFi device has access to a strong internet connection. 

If you are still skeptical about the internet issue, it is recommended that you get in touch with your Internet Service Provider (ISP). Chances are that the internet issue is from their end. In case it is, they’ll send an agent over to your house to help you fix the issue at hand. 

  1. Check the LED Light on the Netgear WiFi Range Extender

After you powered on your extender, did you check the status of the LED light? No? Perhaps you proceeded further without waiting for the LED to turn green. And, that’s where you went wrong! 

To troubleshoot this issue, you need to power cycle your Netgear range extender. It might help! Follow the instructions mentioned below to power cycle your WiFi device:

  • Disconnect all the extra devices connected to your extender.
  • Power off the Netgear extender and unplug it from the wall socket.
  • Reconnect the extender to the power source.
  • Now, wait for the LED light to become green. 

Once the LED light turns green, try to access the Netgear extender setup page. Still no luck?

  1. Check the Connectivity Between the Extender and WiFi Router

Another thing that you can do in order to successfully log into your device is to check the connection between the extender and router. There is a possibility that your extender isn’t well connected to the router, thereby causing all the fuss. 

Therefore, disconnect both your WiFi devices and reconnect them. We recommended you to connect your devices using a wired source rather than a wireless source. It’s a safer option in comparison. 

  1. Update the Firmware of Your Netgear Range Extender

One of the reasons why you aren’t able to log into your Netgear extender is because of a corrupted or outdated firmware. Therefore, the next time you try to access the web admin panel of your device, perform Netgear firmware update first. 

Updating the firmware of your extender will reduce the chances of login failure. So, waste no time in accessing the Settings of your WiFi device and updating its firmware. 

  1. Restore Your Extender to its Factory Default Settings

Last but not least, resetting your device can also help you in accessing the Netgear extender login page without any hassle. In order to restore your extender to its factory default settings, mentioned below are the guidelines you need to follow:

  • Power on your Netgear WiFi extender.
  • Connect the extender to the WiFi router.
  • Look for the Reset button on your device.
  • Once found, take an oil pin and carefully press it.
  • Hold the Reset button for a couple of seconds before releasing it. 

Once you reset your Netgear extender, try to access its web admin panel. Are you able to? If yes, feel free to share your experience with us through the comments section below. 

Continue Reading

Trending

  • bitcoinBitcoin (BTC) $ 34,308.00
  • ethereumEthereum (ETH) $ 1,970.84
  • tetherTether (USDT) $ 0.997616
  • binance-coinBinance Coin (BNB) $ 304.42
  • cardanoCardano (ADA) $ 1.35
  • dogecoinDogecoin (DOGE) $ 0.265899
  • xrpXRP (XRP) $ 0.661746
  • usd-coinUSD Coin (USDC) $ 0.997117
  • polkadotPolkadot (DOT) $ 15.90
  • binance-usdBinance USD (BUSD) $ 0.996063
  • uniswapUniswap (UNI) $ 17.86
  • bitcoin-cashBitcoin Cash (BCH) $ 481.07
  • litecoinLitecoin (LTC) $ 132.97
  • solanaSolana (SOL) $ 31.11
  • chainlinkChainlink (LINK) $ 18.69
  • matic-networkPolygon (MATIC) $ 1.19
  • theta-tokenTheta Network (THETA) $ 7.16
  • wrapped-bitcoinWrapped Bitcoin (WBTC) $ 34,433.00
  • stellarStellar (XLM) $ 0.263986
  • ethereum-classicEthereum Classic (ETC) $ 43.56
  • vechainVeChain (VET) $ 0.079666
  • daiDai (DAI) $ 1.00
  • tronTRON (TRX) $ 0.065822
  • filecoinFilecoin (FIL) $ 56.31
  • internet-computerInternet Computer (ICP) $ 33.73
  • moneroMonero (XMR) $ 217.24
  • eosEOS (EOS) $ 3.87
  • shiba-inuShiba Inu (SHIB) $ 0.000007
  • compound-usd-coincUSDC (CUSDC) $ 0.022138
  • amp-tokenAmp (AMP) $ 0.062978
  • cdaicDAI (CDAI) $ 0.021571
  • okbOKB (OKB) $ 10.29
  • algorandAlgorand (ALGO) $ 0.861368
  • aaveAave (AAVE) $ 208.52
  • klay-tokenKlaytn (KLAY) $ 1.07
  • pancakeswap-tokenPancakeSwap (CAKE) $ 13.62
  • crypto-com-chainCrypto.com Coin (CRO) $ 0.100388
  • cosmosCosmos (ATOM) $ 10.36
  • theta-fuelTheta Fuel (TFUEL) $ 0.471567
  • bitcoin-svBitcoin SV (BSV) $ 131.16
  • celsius-degree-tokenCelsius Network (CEL) $ 5.80
  • neoNEO (NEO) $ 34.68
  • tezosTezos (XTZ) $ 2.79
  • compound-ethercETH (CETH) $ 39.79
  • iotaIOTA (MIOTA) $ 0.824793
  • leo-tokenLEO Token (LEO) $ 2.40
  • ftx-tokenFTX Token (FTT) $ 26.10
  • terra-lunaTerra (LUNA) $ 5.35
  • makerMaker (MKR) $ 2,211.71
  • avalanche-2Avalanche (AVAX) $ 11.35
error: Content is protected !!